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NSLog or os_log: How to Log for Multiple iOS Versions?

February 27, 2017 3:53 PM

Our QA guy informed me one day that he doesn’t see our log messages when testing on an iOS 10 device.

“Good morning Siri darling, ” I clicked the round icon on the top right edge of my screen. “I don’t see my NSLog messages, please advise…”

“You should switch to os_log API”, she arrogantly replied. “And please stop asking me how much is 36 times purple, which bear is best or can Chuck Norris beat Thor in a fistfight”.

Thank you Siri, I’ll see what I can do.

Basically, a quick look around our code revealed that our NSLog calls are no longer displayed in the console application. Now, we write our code as a library. This means that our log messages within the app, the ones our QA looks for when testing, were part of a dylib compiled in release. And under those circumstances, NSLog doesn’t work starting with iOS 10.0. What does work? Well, according to Siri, a new API, the os_log API, should do the trick.

What is os_log API, you ask? Well, officially it’s called the “Unified Logging System.” Its function is described as “centralizing the storage of log data in memory and in a data store on disk.”

And so we were faced with quite the conundrum. The new os_log API is the way to go, Siri said so herself, but it’s only available starting with iOS 10.0. We had no choice – we had to use the new API when available, but still use NSLog for the old versions.

How were we to do that?

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The App Store Policy That Might Get You Rejected in 2017

December 21, 2016 9:48 AM

Update: Apple just announced that it is postponing the ATS compliance deadline. A new deadline is unknown at this time.


During WWDC 2016, in the What’s new in Security session, Apple announced it will start enforcing App Transport Security in the App Store by the end of 2016. Our research indicates that most apps are still using keys that disable this policy and are not ready for this new regulation.

App Transport security (ATS) was introduced during WWDC 2015: “If you link your app against OS X El Capitan or iOS 9, by default it won’t be able to make any unprotected HTTP connections; they will simply fail…”

Now, with 2017 only a few days away, apps face harsher scrutiny by Apple. As if it wasn’t already tough enough getting through the review process unscathed, app publishers are now checked at the door for unsecure connections. Any irregularity and you won’t be let into the store before doing some proper explaining.

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Why Developers Must Analyze their Apps’ Store Reviews & How It’s Done

October 31, 2016 4:35 PM

During the course of my career, I’ve worked with app founders, app developers, product teams and marketers, and many times I have turned to store reviews to find answers. Eventually, I developed a method.

I’m assuming you’ve been in the industry for quite a while by now. I know it’s pretty hard to surprise you with tricks that you haven’t heard of or tried before. But let me try nonetheless.

Apparently, professionals in our industry follow a method, a way to qualitatively analyze their users’ inner thoughts. Using that they fine-tune their product efforts around what is specifically required in order to reach the results they are after.

First thing’s first: Let’s agree that you must find out what doesn’t work in your app, what your users don’t like, what they are struggling with and the issues many of them experience.  You can never guess what your users think of your app. You can never win this business unless you collect feedback methodically.


via GIPHY
Now, let’s talk about ‘the how’.

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Find out Who’s Crashing your Party! Mobile Crash Reporting Tools Review

June 27, 2016 4:46 PM

As every app developer surely knows, monitoring your app’s stability is a must. And there’s hardly anything more important than keeping your crash count down to a minimum. No developer wants to end up with a bad app reputation because he or she didn’t pay enough attention to what’s really going on with their app out in the world.

Fortunately, there is a variety of crash reporting tools at your disposal with which you can arm yourself. These tools help developers identify and respond to common crashes in a timely manner.

Think of reporting tools as alert guard dogs, always ready to let you know if something goes wrong so you can identify the culprit and contain it. They also offer critical data and analysis about the number of crashes, including which devices were affected most and so on.

But, which crash reporting tool should you implement in your app? And, how can it benefit you compared to other tools?

It’s not an easy decision. You need to choose smartly from the plethora of solutions out there. Nobody can do the selection process for you. Not even us. You are the one who knows your product best; Your KPIs, restrictions and budget limitation. But, we can try and ease the process a bit.

To help you make the best decision, we asked multiple app developers about their favorite go-to tools and put together a review of the top tools available.  We also tracked online reviews posted by developers, with remarks about advantages and disadvantages.

Needless to say, we are not engaged with any of these tools, nor do we prefer one over others. Still, we did include qualitative feedback from developers we know or comments that we’ve read through online groups and forums.

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Your App Never Gets Featured? Here Are Some Possible Reasons

March 3, 2016 3:03 PM

A lot has been said about getting featured in Google Play or iTunes and, indeed, it’s a well-justified reputation. Being featured is a blast. True. You get a lot of high-quality users. However, the road to paradise is paved with all kinds of actions that need to be taken and some requirements that need to be met, that many developers are unaware of.

Do you match the standards of quality? Are you being a good developer?

Do you match the standards of quality? Are you being a good developer?

Once upon a time, being featured was almost a commodity. New apps were automatically featured, and just asking the app stores internal teams to feature your app was many times all you needed to do… but those days are over.

Today, there’s a hidden UX and performance standard you just have to meet, if you want your app to be featured in Google Play or in iTunes store. The top developers know it: if you meet with the app stores representatives they will provide some hints, but most app developers aren’t aware of the bits and bytes.  Battery consumption matters, crashes, and so forth, are side effects all app developers encounter. Where are you on the quality score graph? You better be somewhere high or ‘no soup for you!’. Don’t expect Google or Apple to let major performance issues slide. They know it all, and their stores teams are instructed to consider the users interests prior to everything else.

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